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After Net Neutrality: Are You Ready for Fast and Slow Internet Lanes in 2018?

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai - net neutrality opponent
FCC Chairman Ajit Pai - Net neutrality opponent

Welcome to 2018 and unequal internet. Now that federal telecommunication regulators have repealed net neutrality, the rule put in place by the Obama administration that prohibited “paid prioritization,” many internet service providers such as Cox, Verizon, Comcast, Tmobile and Comcast could charge companies more for faster access to their content and place firms who refuse to pay on slower lanes.




These internet service providers including Verizon, AT&T, Comcast, Charter, Cox, Sprint and T-Mobile have refused to rule out faster and slower service (faster and slower lanes) now that net neutrality repeal plans have become law.

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Verizon promised that it would not block or slow down services to certain internet sites but declined to respond to questions about creating fast lanes for companies that pay more.

A statement from Verizon’s vice president Kathy Grillo said Verizon will not dictate how their customers use the service. “We continue to believe that users should be able to access the internet when, where, and how they choose and our customers will continue to do so.”

AT&T said it will not block or slow access to internet sites and services but would not respond to future plans for fast lanes. “We will not block websites, we will not throttle or degrade internet traffic based on content, and we will not unfairly discriminate in our treatment of internet traffic,” AT&T senior executive vice president Bob Quinn said in a blog post.






Comcast said it will not block or slow down access to the internet but has not given plans on fast lanes.  Vice president David Cohen said the company will not discriminate against lawful content on the Internet and will not block or throttle services. “We will be fully transparent with respect to our practices, and we have not entered into any paid prioritization arrangements and we have no plans to do so,” Cohen said.

These internet service providers including Verizon, AT&T, Comcast, Charter, Cox, Sprint and T-Mobile have refused to rule out faster and slower service (faster and slower lanes) now that net neutrality repeal plans have become law.

Charter Communications said it will not slow down access to internet or create internet fast lanes. In a blog post Charter said that it will not interfere with the lawful online practices of  their customers and have no plans to change practices.




“We don’t slow down, block, or discriminate against lawful content. Simply put, we don’t interfere with the lawful online practices of our customers and we have no plans to change our practices,” the company said in a blog post.

Cox Communications said it Will not block or slow access to internet sites and will not create fast lanes. A spokesperson for the company said that the company has no plans to enter into paid prioritization agreements. “We do not block, throttle or otherwise interfere with consumers’ desire to go where they want on the Internet.”

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Sprint said it will not block or have slow access to internet sites but declined to provide definite answer on fast lanes. In a press release, Sprint wrote: Competition is the best way to promote an open internet. “Our position has been and continues to be that competition is the best way to promote an open internet,” the company said.

T-Mobile did not give any information  on fast lanes or slow access. Company spokeswoman said “We have always believed in competition and in a free, open Internet with rules that protect net neutrality: no blocking, no discrimination and transparency.”

 

 

Contributor, The Liberal Advocate News

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